Tag Archives: Social Networking

Participating in the eMINTS Conversation

Maybe the biggest benefit of the Web is the fact that conversations are happening everywhere about almost any topic. The eMINTS community is no different. We have many opportunities for conversation within our many web-based outlets.

This blog is one of those outlets. Commenting or submitting your own blog posts makes Networked Teaching & Learning a perfect location for finding new ideas and resources as well as interacting with others in the eMINTS community. Even if you don’t submit a post or comment, NT&L offers teachers a variety of teaching ideas, online resources, and updates from the eMINTS National Center.

Like many of you, eMINTS has a presence on Facebook. Facebook has made it easier and easier to connect personally and professionally with various networks of people. eMINTS meets you there with a Facebook Page and Group. Both spaces keep you updated as well as allow you to connect to other educators in the eMINTS network.

For those who prefer the professional connections of LinkedIn, eMINTS has you covered there as well. Join the eMINTS Group at LinkedIn as a way to make connections with like-minded educators in a completely professional network.

Two other places to follow eMINTS-related discussions are on Twitter and Tumblr. My Twitter account mostly shares links from this blog, but I will occasionally engage conversations under #edtech and #edchat hashtags. If you’re a Tumblr user, be sure to follow the posts at the eMINTS Tumblr, primarily set up to share resources.

Finally, I will beginning to host Google Hangouts in an attempt to find new and exciting web applications for classroom use. If you are interested in participating in these Hangouts,  add me to your G+ circle and message me about inclusion in the Hangout. Even if the Hangout fills up (there’s a limit of nine participants), it’s an opportunity to chat with other eMINTS educators, possibly setting up your own Hangouts.

Zac Early is an instructional specialist and blogger for the eMINTS National Center.

HD_Links: Teaching Digital Citizenship

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Click for source.

Year 1 eMINTS teachers are getting their student laptops up and running this month and thinking about how they can incorporate these new tools into their classroom lessons and activities. One topic some of the teachers I work with are interested in teaching their students is that of being responsible users of technology and becoming a part of digital communities. Here are a few online resources that may help in teaching those digital citizenship skills.

eThemes has a few themes that may help teach this topic including Teaching Tips: Digital Citizenship, Cyberbullying, Ethics for Students. Check the eThemes A-Z listing or search to find more.

Cybersmartcurriculum.org offers teacher K-12 lesson plans to help teach about the topics of Digital Society, Digital Rights and Responsibilities, Digital Safety and Security, Digital Etiquette, Digital Laws and Ethics, and Lifelong Learning. Lessons are identified by the grade level appropriate for each activity, whether they can be done without a computer or if they may include a web 2.0 tool, and if they require an Internet connection.

BrainPop has a whole group of videos (with additional activities and even quizzes) to help teach students about Digital Citizenship including Copyright, Plagiarism, Online Sources, Digital Etiquette, and many more.

Or check out this Digital Citizen Resources LiveBinder created by computer teacher and blogger, Vicky Sedgwick. The LiveBinder includes TONS of links and resources for teachers, parents, and students interested in learning more about digital citizenship.

What might be some of your favorite resources for teaching digital citizenship?

Brooke Higgins is an on again, off again blogger and instructional specialist with the eMINTS National Center. You can read this and more at her blog Higgins Helpful Hints Blog.

Friday 4All: Teacher’s Pet – Pinterest

For more than a year now I have been a Pinterest addict. I helped introduce it first here back in August on a guest post fromKrissy Venosdale(veteran eMINTS teacher) called “Pinspiration“. More recently you may have read about Pinterest on two different Tuesday Tool posts “Best of 2011” and “Pinterest”.

If you haven’t checked it out, now is the time. Teachers all over the world are using Pinterest to improve instruction. Whether they are pinning bulletin board ideas, images they might use in their lessons, links to technology resources, or to resources that help teach different topics, all are discovering new ideas to improve teaching and learning. Teachers are gathering teaching ideas visually and then sharing them with others.

Here are some Pinterest links to get you started or to keep you hooked…

The Basics and Goodies
What is Pinterest?
How to… with Pin button instructions
How everyday users are using Pinterest
Pin Etiquette
Pinterest Goodies – PinIt button, downloadable Pinterest logos, Pinterest “Follow Me” buttons
Copyright and Pinterest

Teachers and Pinterest
Teaching Blog Addict – “What Have You Found”-blog post about Pinterest link-up with pinboard links
Teaching” Boards Pinterest Search
“Teaching” Pins Pinterest Search
Kelly Tenkely
Krissy Venosdale
Teaching Friends
IdeasFromFutureTeacher
Nyla’s Crafty Teaching

Want to get started…all you need is an invite. Leave a comment here asking for one and I will send it your way. And if you want…

Follow Me on Pinterest

Brooke Higgins is a Pinterest addict and Instructional Specialist with the eMINTS National Center. You can read more at her blog Higgins Helpful Hints Blog.

The Pinterest logo was created by Michael Deal and Juan Carlos Pagan and can be found at http://passets-cdn.pinterest.com/images/about/logos/Pinterest_Logo.png

HD_Links: Wish I Was There – ISTE 2011:Philadelphia

The largest educational technology conference in the United States is going on right now in Philadelphia, PA. Formerly known as NECC, ISTE 2011 is the place for educators to meet to share what is going on in educational technology and what is just over the horizon.

I have had the chance to attend this conference twice and can say that it is an unbelievable opportunity to network with others that value the use of technology as an educational tool and a key component of 21st century learning.

Even though I don’t get to be there in person this year, there are many ways that I am staying connected and learning about what is new in technology and education at ISTE. Here are a few of the resources available to everyone so that we can all “virtually” attend the conference and stay connected.

ISTE Conference Website – with links to everything you would need to know if you were there like the conference mobile app, the daily schedule, exhibit hall floorplan, but there is so much more.

Another must have ISTE resource:

Thursday’s Tip: Supporting Self-Directedness

Self-Directed – “Directed or guided by oneself, especially as an independent agent”

When you think about it, we all want to be self-directed.  We want the ability and freedom to guide ourselves; to make choices based on a sound thought process, and the independence to tailor learning, thinking, and life to our own style and needs.   Being teachers, we also strive to achieve that same ability and desire in our students.  We want them to be self-directed with their thoughts, learning, and life.  Our biggest obstacle is: How do we achieve self-directedness in ourselves and our students?  As we first focus on ourselves for this post, there are several ways to move towards becoming self-directed.  With summer here, we can take some time and explore possible avenues to help meet that goal.


We might consider the development of our own Personal Learning Network (PLN) through blogs, wikis, Twitter, Facebook, and other social networks.  We can choose the ones that allow us to develop skills, learn about new technologies, explore teaching strategies, see a variety of perspectives, and learn about educational issues affecting not only ourselves but the world.  A variety of tools and media allows us to develop a PLN that fits our individual learning styles as well as connect to the global education community where we can gain and share new learning.

Another way to move towards becoming a self-directed individual is through the organization of our thought process.  We have discussed in previous posts ways to reflect and plan.  We can implement these skills in almost any situation and in everything we do.  We can ask ourselves questions to develop a plan, and then once the event is over, reflect on ways to continue or improve what we did. This can include the setting of goals and monitoring the follow through of those goals.   As we take these pieces of planning and reflecting and internalize the process, we move ourselves closer to becoming a more self-directed person.

So some questions that could support you in becoming more self-directed that you might want to consider are:

  • What goals might you have for yourself in becoming self-directed?
  • What might be some strategies you can use to develop your ability to be self-directed?
  • What learning styles and preferences in yourself do you need to consider in becoming self-directed?

Taking the steps in becoming more self-directed may seem small but can have a powerful impact on how we approach and handle life.  As the Australian song reminds us – “From little things, big things grow” – Paul Kelly

Carmen Marty, Terri Brines, & Brooke Higgins are eMINTS Instructional Specialists and Cognitive Coaching/eMINTS Agency Trainers. For more information about Cognitive Coaching and related seminars visit the eMINTS National Center events page.

mathplourde (Photographer). (2007). My PLN Banner. [Web]. Retrieved from http://www.flickr.com/photos/mathplourde/4618916837/

Thursday’s Tip: NASA TweetUp – eMINTS Teacher @ Space Shuttle Launch

Veteran eMINTS teacher from Hillsboro, MO, Krissy Venosdale, GreatDayToLearn.com and TeachFactory.com, is blogging and tweeting from NASA’s launch site this week. She was invited to attend and be a part of the NASA TweetUp.

“What is a Tweetup? A Tweetup is an informal meeting of people who use the social messaging medium Twitter. This Tweetup is an opportunity to learn more about NASA, explore NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida and experience a space shuttle launch.” Krissy, known as KTVee on Twitter, is one of a few applicants that will be allowed behind the curtain to share with the world what happens, moment by moment, at the launch of the Endeavor space shuttle.

T-Shirt Krissy made with her students names so they could "attend" with her.

She wants to bring this awesome event to her students and yours by sharing her experience. Her blog will provide a live countdown, videos, pictures, interesting facts, teaching ideas, and her latest tweets. You can even ask her a question that she will pass on to a real astronaut.

What a great way to get your kids excited all while learning about math, science, and more. Check out her event blog, Learning Endeavour: One Teachers Space Shuttle Launch Experience to learn more and be a part of the Friday launch.

Brooke Higgins is an instructional specialist with the eMINTS National Center. You can read more at her blog Higgins Helpful Hints Blog.

*NASA, . “Connect and Collaborate with NASA.” 04apr2011. Discussion Board.
*“Endeavor.” Flickr – Koocheekoo. Web. 27 Apr 2011. <http://www.flickr.com/photos/koocheekoo/2331555537/>.
*“NASA TweetUp T-Shirt.” Flickr – KTVee. Web. 27 Apr 2011. <http://www.flickr.com/photos/venosdale/5657841099/in/photostream/>.

Tuesday’s Tool: I Published My Own Newspaper

Ok, I am probably pushing it just a bit when I say “I published My Own Newspaper”. What I should say is that paper.li created a “newspaper” based on the people that I follow on Twitter and what they have recently tweeted. It took only a few minutes after I logged in using my Twitter account.

The HigginsB Daily

When I open my Paper.li newspaper, The HigginsB Daily, I can easily scan the front page and see headlines from the day. Each “article” is  based on the information my PLN is interested in that they have shared on Twitter. With one click, I can be reading the web content shared by the people I follow. Every article includes a small image and the username of the person that submitted that tweet so that I know who the information was shared by. The paper also includes a hashtag (#), photos, and multimedia sections and my running Twitter feed.

Paper.li is a web 2.0 tool that “organizes links shared on Twitter and Facebook into an easy to read newspaper-style format.” There is another website, The Tweeted Times, that creates a personalized newspaper in the same way but what makes Paper.li so nice is how it organizes and categorizes the content.

Cool features: users can read anyone’s Paper.li newspaper from anyone that has created one or they can create a paper based on other Twitter or Facebook users. Paper.li newspapers can be set to update daily or even more frequently depending on user preferences, and Paper.li sends an email each day letting users know that there is new news to read.

Some downsides: there is a bit of advertising. The people at Paper.li have to get paid somehow :). Also, Paper.li can’t filter the content on the page since they are simply aggregating content based on who the user follows. Depending on what PLN members share, there may be some questionable content. Users should test the site before using it with students.

Teachers, classrooms or individual students could create their own newspapers daily, weekly, or whenever and stay up to date with current events based on the “news” from their PLN.

OwlDesk on YouTube has a video, Social Media Tool: PaperLi, that quickly overviews how the tool works.

Brooke Higgins is an instructional specialist with the eMINTS National Center. You can read more at her blog Higgins Helpful Hints Blog.

Friday 4ALL: A Diamond in the Sea of Social Networks

We can learn so much from each other and social networks are just the place for that to happen.  Finding the really good and beneficial ones can often be quite the job.
One social network that provides so much information and support is Classroom 2.0. This is a network dedicated to social media among educators.  Just visiting it and joining will provide you with a wealth of information but a part that I think is absolutely fantastic are the weekly webinars or Classroom 2.0 LIVE.  These webinars are on a variety of topics like web 2.0 tools, classroom strategies, ideas for communicating with parents; just to name a few.  They are conducted through Elluminate, a great tool in itself. The site provides a list of links for the webinar so you can access anything mentioned.
Sounds great, right? The greatness doesn’t stop there.  They also have…. ta-da, archived recordings of past webinars. (Such a great idea!)  Think of all those times you can’t make a webinar but really want the information.  It also contains follow up reading or viewing suggestions.  This is like the crown jewel of all social networks for me.  I hope you will enjoy it as well.
Terri Brines is an instructional specialist with the eMINTS National Center.
To see what else eMINTS is doing with social networking, check out our groups on Facebook and Linked-In. Also, follow me on Twitter at @Zac_eMINTS. -Zac

Micro Blogging for Students

Edmodo is a microblogging site designed with education in mind.  Teachers create a free account and can set up an online environment, which allows creation of groups, sharing of links and files, and an area for conversations but not private chats.  Gradebook and drop boxes are also included.  If you want to stay connected to your students at all times, Edomodo has a mobile phone application as well.  Edmodo is like taking Twitter and Facebook and tweaking them to be used in the educational setting.

More on Edmodo from Ms. De Santis’ Blog.

Carmen Marty is an instructional specialist for the eMINTS National Center.