Tag Archives: Mashable

HD_Links: Five Helpful Links

Happy Wednesday/Hump Day (HD), everyone! Here are a few useful links to get you through your week.

  1. Lifehacker provides some nice advice in their “Emailable Tech Support.” Today’s post [How to Browse the Web Using Tabs (for Beginners)] features the basics of tab browsing, which can be an effective and useful practice to get into when doing online research. Sometimes, we are more likely to return to a task or webpage if the tab is left open as opposed to copying the URL or bookmarking the page.
  2. Trying to teach debate or opposing viewpoints in politics? Mashable points out that YouTube is launching a channel where they match members of Congress debating two sides of a given issue. As is typical in the beltway, things can get pretty heated. So, you’ll want to preview the debates before sharing them with students. Read “YouTube Matches Congress Members For Debates On New Town Hall Platform” here.
  3. Looking for a simple file sharing app? How about one that is so simple that sharing can happen by simply dragging and dropping files? Check out Fyles, the free service that provides 2GB of space, a link for your shared items, and a password for future deletion. (via Lifehacker)
  4. From Google Labs (via EdTech Toolbox) comes Google Public Data Explorer. With this tool, students can compare data sets and create their own infographics. Easy to explore, visualize, and communicate data sets, Google Public Data Explorer is another free tool from your friends in Mountain View, CA.
  5. Edutopia addresses the differentiation issue with a specific example of how one school in South Carolina is utilizing technology to provide individualized learning facilitation that works. Even without loads of technology, the tips provided are good things to keep in mind for your own differentiation, but with technology the article demonstrates how powerful technology can be in the diverse, 21st century classroom. (H/T Edgalaxy)

Zac Early is an instructional specialist for the eMINTS National with a rather large number of subscriptions in his Google Reader that he follows so that you don’t have to.

Thursday’s Tip(s): Top Five Tips

Typically, we give you one great tip on our Thursday post, but today is your lucky day. We have five top tips from around the Web to get your 2011 off to a great start.

  1. Larry Ferlazzo has updated his list of great temporary email services with Webemail.me. Why do you need temporary email addresses? If your school doesn’t provide email to students and you want to use an online tool which requires an email address, you’ll need some temporary email addresses. Webemail.me is just the latest in a long line of such services. Larry’s complete list is here.
  2. Looking for a large data set for teaching students statistics, graphing, and various other math concepts? Or are you looking for geographic and demographic-centric lessons for you students’ social studies education? Check out the US census data for all your data needs. In the New York Times’ Learning Network Blog, there’s an easily adaptable lesson on utilizing this data in a social studies setting. At the very least, the lesson gives some great ideas for using census data with your students.
  3. Also from theĀ New York Times’ Learning Network Blog, a reader of the blog submitted a fantastic lesson idea using a Nicholas Kristof piece on Guinea worms. There are plenty of resources and activities in this rather engaging unit.
  4. Looking for ways to use Skype in the classroom? How about assessment of learning? Silvia Tolisano at Langwitches Blog does a great job of sharing many ideas and resources for using Skype in formative assessment. Don’t take my word for it, check out her post here and begin downloading Skype for free ASAP! (H/T Carmen Marty, eIS)
  5. Finally, from the tech/online tools side of things, Mashable offers up a list of tools that can be used to help you and your students make sense of the enormous amount of data available on the web. The hot new practice of Web 2.0 is the curation of information. The tools identified in this post are perfect for organizing and collecting all the data under a given subject. Check the post out and choose the one that best suits your needs.

We hope these tips provide some inspiration for a new year and new semester. What tips do you have that might help your fellow teachers out in 2011? If you have a tip that requires an in depth look, submit your idea to our blog submission form and join the conversation at Networked Teaching & Learning.

Zac Early is an instructional specialist with the eMINTS National Center.