Category Archives: Resource Links

What Really Happened At Thanksgiving?

Looking for a lesson or activity exploring the different perspectives of the first Thanksgiving? Look no further than What Really Happened At Thanksgiving? for an investigation that will engage students and cause them to think critically.

There will be no need for turkeys made from the outlines of our hands or paper pilgrim hats. What Really Happened At Thanksgiving? is a great way to engage students in authentic learning around a holiday event based on historical events. From the Plimoth Plantation, this interactive website takes students through the process of investigating Thanksgiving as historians. Your historians will participate in activities that separate fact from myth, identify and analyze primary resources, make educational guesses using cultural clues, and consider multiple points of view.

Including in this interactive website is a teacher’s guide. The guide provides classroom activities that coincide with online activities. Also included are national social studies standards and other resources. Either use the site for a last minute fill in for those days leading up to Thanksgiving or plan out a more elaborate unit on Native Americans and European colonization of the Americas. This resource is really adaptive to your needs. The ideal grade levels for this resource are 3rd-5th.

Zac Early is an instructional specialist for the eMINTS National Center. He currently manages Networked Teaching & Learning while neglecting his own blogs, particularly Suppl_eMINTS.

Google Earth in the Classroom

AntWeb- Google Earth MapWish you could “ travel to cities across the globe, dive into the depths of the ocean, explore remote islands and even fly to faraway galaxies”? You can!

Google Earth allows you and your students to explore the universe. Visit the Google Earth Download page to install Google Earth 5 on your computer. The Google Earth User’s Guide is a great place to learn how to get started. Google Earth Learn allows you and your students to learn skills and practice those by completing challenges.

How will you use Google Earth in your instruction?

Michelle Kendrick is a program coordinator for the eMINTS National Center.

Google Earth as a Collaborative Tool

Google Earth is a great way to help students read maps and develop an understanding of geography, but Google Earth can also be a great tool for sharing data during a collaborative project.

Google Earth allows students to add text, data and pictures to a particular location on a map. Locations can be entered into Google Earth using GPS coordinates or simply an address. Descriptions, data and photos can be added to each location.

All of this material can be saved as a kmz file for sharing with others. These files can be opened in Google Earth for display on any computer. Collaboration with students from different geographic areas can be facilitated by uploading the kmz file to a website or portal where participants from different schools can download the file and add their information.

The Google Earth tutorial is a great place to start in learning to add data to Google Earth documents.

The Google Earth Community also has some helpful tutorials.

Many projects that involve examining different geographic locations could be enhanced by using Google Earth. Consider how adding pictures and text to locations on Google Earth might add to a Flat Stanley Project .

Many science investigations could benefit from using Google Earth to record information collected from different geographic locations. The Pathfinder Science Project involves many such investigations.

What about Chewing the Fat ? In this online project, students from different areas collect examples of slang. In the How Much Does it Cost project ,students compare the cost of items in different areas of the world . The ideas are endless.

Do you have other ideas for using Google Earth for sharing information and data?

Michelle Kendrick is a program coordinator for the eMINTS National Center.

Students ReThinking Education

We often hear adults sharing how education should or shouldn”t be changed.  We hear politicians and Please be aware location, income, smoking status, family size and age all casino online affect the cost of your health cheap health insurance premium. business people discussing the focus of education.  View and enjoy these videos by students who are rethinking their education.
Carmen Marty is an instructional specialist for the eMINTS National Center.

Just Five Minutes Each Day

Teachers are pressed for time. There is not enough time for planning, grading, and keeping up with the latest in education. There seems to be especially little time for the range of curriculum we must uncover. But have you ever considered what your class might accomplish in just five minutes each day?

This group of students at Bangalow Public School in Australia decided they might actually change the world in just five minutes a day. Check out their video. to see what they accomplished.

What could your students do if you gave them just five minutes each morning of the school day?

If your students come up with their own great idea to save the planet, funding for their project might be available from the Captain Planet Foundation.

Michelle Kendrick is a program coordinator for the eMINTS National Center.

A Picture Shouldn’t Be Worth a Thousand Minutes

Worth 1000 - 3rd edition
We all know the saying A picture is worth a thousand words and good practice suggests using images to convey a message and evoke feelings when creating materials for learners. It’s another way to grab the learner’s attention and engage them at the same time speaking to different learning styles.

The problem is that copyright free images can take more than a thousand minutes to find. While we know using images is important, eMINTS teachers are challenged to find those they can legally use on published documents. It’s very difficult to find images they and their students can include in websites, WebQuests, and other online content as well as classroom materials. With student’s eyes on them daily, teachers want to model ethical practices and give credit where credit is due to pass that skill on to students.

Take this blog post for example…. I wanted to find an image to drive home my point. It could have taken me longer to find the image than it did for me to create the entire post but I used a couple of strategies and resources to help expedite the process. Some of these strategies may help you on your next search for images.

  1. Brainstorm key words to search and go beyond the obvious to identifying main themes you want to communicate.
  2. Use your own original images. Take pictures with your own camera or scan in images you or your students have created.
  3. Search for images under the Creative Commons license (Flickr offers a quick and easy explanation of that licensing)
  4. Find and use sights for finding photos as well as clip art such as those listed below. Always remember to save the link back to the original image so that you can give credit to the owner.Photos
    Flickr – use advanced search to only search within Creative Commons lisence content
    EduPic
    Pics4Learning
    Wikimedia (how to use wikimedia)
    Clip Art
    Phillip Martin Clip Art
    Microsoft Office Images – not all content is copyright free for online publication, read fine print
    Discovery Schools Clip Art Gallery – read copyright permissions

If you have additional resources or suggestions on this topic please comment and share them with us all. Happy image searching to you; may your searches be short and sweet.

Brooke Higgins is an instructional specialist with the eMINTS National Center. You can visit her site here or read her blog, Higgins’ Helpful Hints.

Image – “Worth 1000 – 3rd Edition.” Flickr – spcbrass’. Web. 21 Oct 2010. <http://www.flickr.com/photos/spcbrass/4543486633/#/>.