Thursday’s Tip: What’s Your Style?

I look at the faces within my classroom. Each face is different, filled with individuals. Then, as an educator, I need to remind myself that each individual student has a strength and weakness in how they learn. Understanding how a student learns and applying a variety of learning opportunities in the classroom opens the door for all students to achieve success.

Digging for ways to apply the theory of multiple intelligences and learning styles within classroom lessons can take time and effort for the teacher. Time is something we cherish and are not always willing to give up. So, how can I use my time effectively and still open the door to helping students achieve through their strengths?

It would be good to refresh my understanding of multiple intelligences (body, linguistic, spacial, intrapersonal, interpersonal, musical, naturalist, and logic) and learning styles (visual, auditory, and kinesthetic & tactile). What does each mean? How does each type of learning transfer into a classroom situation?

To help save time throughout the year, I created a list of possible products. Each product is generic enough that it could be used within any area of study. This list will change into a checklist as I decide which multiple intelligences and learning styles are evident within the product. Writing a short note to each intelligence or style, explaining why each connects to the product, will help as the product is more refined later to a particular lesson and subject.

A student working within a cooperative group can create a skit. This project could include the learning styles of: interpersonal, body, and kinesthetic & tactile. Logic could be added if the student needed to organize information gathered.

As a teacher, it is so important to consider each of my students. I need to take into account the different ways each student learns and then apply that in formation within my lessons. It is important that each student has the opportunity to achieve success.

Resources:
Using All Your Smarts
How to address multiple intelligences in the classroom

Michele Smith is an instructional specialist for the eMINTS National Center.

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